Inspired by Prof. Yoshinobu Miyamoto
https://www.flickr.com/photos/yoshinobu_miyamoto/sets






Rotation Erection System

December 20th, 2018

 
 

Inspired by Michael Kane, 1974
Jewelery-Section V&A
What
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This installation shows an interactive stop-motion sketch of a brooch by Michael Kane from 1974, which is projected onto a wall. By means of a controller, the viewer has the opportunity to spatially rotate the brooch and to switch between different stages of the drawing process. Graphically, the drawings are kept very simple in order to focus on the movement and to explain the complex mechanical structure of the object.

IMG_5038

Why
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The brief of the project was, to design a work on the topic of information based on a visit in the Victoria & Albert Museum. My personal aspiration was, to find an exhibit containing hidden information that I can make accessible to the viewer through my work.

The choice finally fell on a brooch, about 10 cm in size, in the jewelry department of the museum, which consists of three nested rings. Since the piece of jewelery was only presented in a static state behind glass, that actually fascinating information; consisting in its construction and range of motion; was hidden.

In order to make this tangible and lead the viewer away from the materiality of the object, towards its construction, I decided on a graphically simple representation of the movement in the style of a construction drawing. By being able to control the movement itself and its level of detail, the viewer is invited to engage with the initially inconspicuous acting object and to experience its hidden information in an interactive way.

In order to find a suitable object I studied the behavior of the visitors in interaction with the presentation of the pieces. Especially in the jewelry section many people tried to get very close to the object and find views from different angles, which was often denied by the glazing of the showcases.

How
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After selecting the object, I made several sketches to understand its function, which I then transferred to Cinema 4D. In the 3D program it was possible to move the object freely and to look at it from every angle. Since that was precisely what was missing, this freedom and possibility of movement represented the core element for the final development.
Since the materiality of the object is not in the focus as mentioned above, the simple drawings also provided a good basis for the final implementation.

To do this, several tests had to be done around stop-motion animations and perspectives . The individual images were then produced on the basis of the created 3D model and made tangible through dynamic textures using Unity 3D. The user has the possibility of two buttons on the one hand to turn the virtual brooch and to switch between the various stages of drawing work.

Next
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The installation should be placed close to the actual object to provide a permanent reference to it. In addition, it turned out that the entire drawing style was a bit coarse and perhaps too abstract. This could be achieved through finer and more detailed drawings.

To optimize the elaborate production of the individual drawings, the development of a shader used in Unity 3D would be possible. This would allow a completely free movement of the object and would provide a dynamic workflow in the elaboration of the graphic style.

Anatomy of a brooch

December 7th, 2018

 
 

Main Article:
[ www.ichhabeeinganzmiesesgefuehl.de ]

Medium Paper:
[ medium.com ]

In collaboration with Gregor Finger

Begleitung:
Prof. Erich Schöls / Fakultät Gestaltung Würzburg
Manuel Michel / Fakultät Gestaltung Würzburg

VR3

VR

VR2

Experiments on perception in VR

May 28th, 2015

 
 

The 3D printed inner workings of my WiFi Voodoo Doll. [ twitter @ChRehcep ]

[ Step 01 ] [ Step 02 ] [ Step 03 ] [ result ]

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03

04

06

02

05

07

09

08

10

11

WiFi Voodoo – Step 03

January 25th, 2015

Further prototyping on my UX project, using static charge to visualize WiFi signal. [ twitter @ChRehcep ]

[ Step 01 ] [ Step 02 ] [ Step 03 ] [ result ]

2015-01-16_Wi-Fi_00

2015-01-16_Wi-Fi_02

2015-01-16_Wi-Fi_03

2015-01-16_Wi-Fi_04

2015-01-16_Wi-Fi_05

2015-01-16_Wi-Fi_06

2015-01-16_Wi-Fi_08

2015-01-16_Wi-Fi_07

2015-01-16_Wi-Fi_01

WiFi Voodoo – Step 02

January 16th, 2015

Some prototyping on my current UX project, using an Arduino Yún to visualize WiFi signals. [ twitter @ChRehcep ]

[ Step 01 ] [ Step 02 ] [ Step 03 ] [ result ]

wifi_00_DSC_0063

2014-12-20_wifi_motor_Christian Pecher

2014-12-20_wifi_motor_Christian Pecher

2014-12-20_wifi_motor_Christian Pecher

2014-12-20_wifi_motor_Christian Pecher

WiFi Voodoo – Step 01

December 20th, 2014

clime_christian-pecher_3

#HowYouWouldUseClime

December 3rd, 2014

5 Werkstücke [1300 x 900 mm]
Ein Leben in Freiheit. Der eigene Staat. Die gelebte Utopie.
Fünf einzigartige Nationen, die sich der Norm abgewandt haben und
den Begriff der Gemeinschaft neu definieren. Selbstverwirklichung und Unabhängigkeit trotz fehlender Anerkennung souveräner Staaten.

Unser Ziel war es genau diese Punkte durch unser Projekt erfahrbar zu machen. Nicht nur für den Betrachter, sondern auch für uns während des Entstehungsprozesses. Weg von alltäglichen Medien, ran ans Material, experimentieren, scheitern und dabei unser Handeln neu definieren.

So entwickelten sich unsere Werkstücke auf eine besondere Art und
Weise. Wir kombinierten moderne Techniken mit brachialer Handarbeit, entwickelten absurde Methoden und lebten abseits anderer Projekte
unser Experiment.

Christian Pecher / Jonas Kraus     [ making of ]    [ result ]

Begleitung: Prof. Christoph Barth / Fakultät Gestaltung Würzburg

[ behance ]      [ design made in germany ]      [ open:output ]     


Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

Mikroperium 2014 - Christian Pecher © -  Jonas Kraus ©

[ making of ]    [ result ]

Mikroperium – making of

July 15th, 2014

bw

Dunkle Früchte

July 15th, 2014